Photos: Abandoned Tuberculosis hospital

Back in the day, tuberculosis was deadly and incurable.  People were sent to “asylums” to live out their days.  When I look at the photos here, I don’t see the abandoned hospital, but I see how it must have looked when built:  state-of-the-art, with a beautiful dome and windows and grounds.  These were times where the sick were given a place to go to recover (or live until death)….you know, when we gave a sh*t about them.

I found this passage on the wiki page interesting:

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Tuberculosis is closely linked to both overcrowding and malnutrition, making it one of the principal diseases of poverty.[8] Those at high risk thus include: people who inject illicit drugs, inhabitants and employees of locales where vulnerable people gather (e.g. prisons and homeless shelters), medically underprivileged and resource-poor communities, high-risk ethnic minorities, children in close contact with high-risk category patients, and health-care providers serving these patients.[36]

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Diet is not mentioned, as in how eating chemically raised food damages the immune system, making one more vulnerable to disease. Even if one eats what is considered a balanced diet, one can still be malnourished if the gut is not able to digest and absorb the nutrients.  This is the case when the gut is damaged by gluten, chemicals, and GMO’s.

When it mentions the poor, homeless, and prison populations, it doesn’t advocate growing organic food at prisons or access to acreage for homeless shelters to grow their own organic food….

And we know from the ebola disease called the “nurse killer” that healthcare workers are not given the resources they need to protect themselves and their patients from transmission.  One can only wonder how many Ebola cases were from nurses transferring the germs to other patients.  And that is not in any way a condemnation of the nurses–they were not given the proper equipment to protect themselves and prevent further transference of the germs.

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